Motorcycle Clubs 101 – Preventing Internal Theft From Destroying Your Motorcycle Club

Theft is a serious matter that breaks apart many of today’s motorcycle clubs. But you may be surprised to find out that corruption has been the bane of them since the beginning. Often they are unsuspectingly setup to fall prey to corruption and corrupt leaders from the first day that they are established simply because of the way many motorcycle clubs are run. By the very fact that clubs are operated within a hierarchy that supports the notion of presidents and officers that have ultimate authority over members, automatically creates an upper class of individuals who can take advantage of the club’s resources – even if the motorcycle club votes on most measures and practices democratic ideals. The bottom line is that it takes good planning and a vigilant watch by members and officers alike to prevent corruption from creeping in and destroying your club family especially at revenue generating events where sticky hands may be the difference between a great event and not even breaking even.

Typically the theft problems begin after a club discovers a financial stream that is above and beyond revenues derived by members paying their dues. A motorcycle club may acquire a clubhouse, host an annual dance or celebration, a picnic, barbeque, poker run or some other function that draws in hundreds or thousands of people who will pay from between $10.00 and $20.00 each for entrance or participation fees, plus drinks, food, raffles, races and other activities. These revenue generating events can bring more money overnight, than many of the members may have ever made on a job in their lives and this can be an open invitation to theft!

In one instance the club’s members held an annual dance that generated $70,000 dollars over one weekend. Since there was no plan to handle the money or even a bank account in place, when $25,000 dollars of the money came up missing in the first week an internal war broke out. By the end of the month all of the money was gone and the members were practically shooting at one another in meetings. It wasn’t long after that the club split up never to fly its colors again and the members who were once united as brothers were gunning for one another in the streets.

Another motorcycle club started an after-hours set at their clubhouse that was open late nights every weekend. They began taking in about $7,500 dollars per night and that is when their problems began. Since they operated as a non-profit organization they never put their money in a bank 수원셔츠룸 because they were really trying to avoid paying Uncle Sam his due. As a result they had thousands of dollars neatly tucked-away in the clubhouse safe. Needless to say the money started to come up missing as there were several people who had keys to the safe and it was not long before that motorcycle club was feuding from within and eventually wound up breaking apart.

These stories are sad but are typical and if you have heard or seen them before you may wonder how you can protect your club or get your it out of this kind of trouble? You can prevent or stop these kinds of episodes from occurring with just a little prior planning and by adhering to some common sense rules that will allow your motorcycle club to steer clear of the pick pockets that will fleece it of its hard-earned spoils. And if your club is already up to its neck in this kind of issue – do not fight; stop, initiate some new rules and then move on. There is no use in crying over spilled milk. The money is gone and it would not be gone if you-all had handled your club business more professionally in the first place.